/blog > Your Career

Last week, Towers Watson’s Global Workforce Study reported that Career Management Programs are missing the mark, with many employees feeling that their companies are not adequately supporting or providing visibility of career development opportunities. It seems strange that many organizations report challenges around staff retention, but are not helping employees to identify opportunities to develop their skills and careers within the organization. The result is that, often after significant investment in training, companies are losing valuable employees to competitors. Often it’s not until the employee hands in their notice to leave that their managers express surprise and say they were going to be earmarked for a promotion some time soon. Technology enables us to make so many processes at work more efficient and transparent, but career management initiatives are often antiquated and secretive, being managed as succession planning initiatives that are often invisible to the employees, who feel they’re not…

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War on talent

Most companies recognize the value in attracting and retaining the right employees. With growth projections for the US workforce of 4.4% from 2013-2017, it is also predicted that there will be accelerated turnover in many organizations.  Employees are expensive to attract and train, so losing employees to competitors can prove very costly. Accordingly, it makes sense for companies to have clear strategies to retain valued employees, by providing them with the information and tools they need to continue to grow – both in terms of their skill sets and their career progression. Clearly the more skills an employee has, the more valuable and attractive they are to both your organization and your competitors’ organizations. Whilst there is a lot of discussion about “Talent Management”, this all-encompassing term covers many different components of attracting, developing and managing employees.  “Career Management” or “Career Development” more specifically covers the steps an employee needs…

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contract-management

In most organizations, HR has come a long way since the filing cabinets stuffed full of employee resumes, appraisals etc., but many systems in place today are legacy systems that simply transferred those paper processes onto a computer.  Hiring decisions may have been made based on these files, but often in isolation from any other information used by HR. For a long time job roles have been defined by HR leaders and managers to define the “ideal” profile and skill-set for particular role, but this has often been built on assumptions based on past profiles, rather than applying any serious analysis to it. The transparency revolution has greatly increased the amount of information easily available on employees and candidates, with sites like LinkedIn having millions of detailed profiles that are largely publicly searchable, so there’s plenty of data out there to start analyzing. This makes it all the more surprising…

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scroogemcduck

Brazen Careerist has the down-low on the career that we should all be preparing for, irrespective of our skills: Your mystery career is investing Does that surprise you? Does it surprise you that whether you’re a doctor, bus driver, rocket scientist or business executive, your ultimate job title will be none of those, but rather “investor”? Think about it: most of us, if not all, have this vague notion that “one day” we will “retire”—both nebulous notions meaning different things to different people. “One day” could be a magic age, such as 40, 50 or 60. It could be later in life because “you don’t want to stop working.” And “retire” may mean golfing all day, traveling the world, starting a new business, being a painter or writer, or any other pastime of your choice. I think they’re on to something there. I would add that it’s probably a good idea to…

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jumper

So often people have no idea what career they really want to follow. The advice from this video is simple – do whatever interests you and makes you happy. If you really like what you’re doing, you’ll become a master of it, and there’s always someone interested in paying you for what you’ve mastered. If you’re doing something you hate you’re never going to get the reward you want, or as the video puts it: “It’s all retch and no vomit”.  Read More…

Time is money

Is it true that more and more men, even lawyers,  are unwilling to sacrifice personal time for professional goals? I have a close friend who comes out of a large law firm who expected him to commit 80 hours a week. I showed him this article. He viewed the article with a certain level of skepticism. Anne C. Weisberg, a talent director for Deloitte, explains in the article how and why their organization has instituted a cutting-edge approach to the work environment called Mass Career Customization. It includes the following points: Changing family structure. Department of Labor statistics reveal that in 83 percent of households both the husband and wife are now in the workforce. Increased numbers of women workers. Looking at the legal profession alone, women make up at least half of law students—yet personal versus professional demands and the lack of career satisfaction lead many of them to leave…

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bull_by_horns2

The Mayans were wrong and 2013 has started relatively uneventfully. Most of us are back at work, so now is a good time to take stock and consider what you want to achieve in your career in 2013.   Forget about not drinking for a month and instead think about what went well and what could have gone better in 2012, and consider how to make 2013 a productive year for your career.   This doesn’t have to be too onerous a task, with lofty goals set for the whole year. As Adrian Granzella Larssen suggests in ‘5 Career Resolutions Everyone Should Make in 2013’, this could be as simple as resolving to add some new skills to your resume this year by taking a course, or making a list of what didn’t make you happy in your job last year, and thinking about what you might do to avoid the…

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girlonhammock

Brazen Life offers four reasons to leave your job, “even if you’re comfortable,” featuring solid advice on avoiding burnout, adding variety, and looking to make that big next move. My only quibble with the list is that it implies that being “comfortable” might be sufficient reason to stay with a job. Is it? For me, applying the word “comfortable” as the reason to stick with  anything other than a good pair of fuzzy slippers implies some level of compromise. Would being “comfortable” be a good reason to stay in a relationship? “He cheats on me, but it’s comfortable.” “We haven’t spoken in six months, but it’s comfortable.” Ah, one might argue, a relationship can be comfortable and a lot of other good things, too. Comfortable doesn’t have to go along with something bad. A relationship can be comfortable and also passionate, respectful, joyful, fulfilling. Precisely. And those would be good…

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sleepwalking-man2

Ask many HR professionals if their company has any Career Management initiatives and you may get a blank look and be asked what you mean by Career Management.   So it comes as no surprise that research like the recent YouGov Survey in the UK, conducted on behalf of Fairplace, concludes that many organizations have disengaged employees, which can seriously impact productivity.  The survey found that 39% of people are “sleep-walking” through their careers, with no career paths or development plans in place.   Definitions of “Career Management” vary, but Wikipedia seems to do a fairly good job of defining it:   “Career Management is the combination of structured planning and the active management choice of one’s own professional career. The outcome of successful career management should include personal fulfillment, work/life balance, goal achievement and financial security.”   Individuals need to take control of their own careers, which means understanding…

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kittinger

So did you hear about this guy who rode a balloon out into space — more than 100,000 feet up! — and jumped from it, hurtling towards the earth at hundreds of miles per hour before safely parachuting to the ground? His name is Joseph Kittinger. He made his astounding leap from the US Air Force experimental craft Excelsior III some 52 years ago,  on August 16, 1960. You may have seen Kittinger recently (or at least heard his voice), as he was in charge of mission control communications for Felix Baumgartner’s successful space jump — which finally, after all these years, broke Kittinger’s records for skydiving altitude and skydiving speed. It’s less likely that you’ve heard of Nick Piantinida, who broke Kittinger’s record for high-altitude ballooning on February 6, 1966, reaching 123,500 feet in his balloon named Strato Jumper II. Unfortunately, Piantinida’s attempts at beating Kittinger’s skydiving record were unsuccessful;…

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