/blog > Talent Management

Last week, Towers Watson’s Global Workforce Study reported that Career Management Programs are missing the mark, with many employees feeling that their companies are not adequately supporting or providing visibility of career development opportunities. It seems strange that many organizations report challenges around staff retention, but are not helping employees to identify opportunities to develop their skills and careers within the organization. The result is that, often after significant investment in training, companies are losing valuable employees to competitors. Often it’s not until the employee hands in their notice to leave that their managers express surprise and say they were going to be earmarked for a promotion some time soon. Technology enables us to make so many processes at work more efficient and transparent, but career management initiatives are often antiquated and secretive, being managed as succession planning initiatives that are often invisible to the employees, who feel they’re not…

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War on talent

Most companies recognize the value in attracting and retaining the right employees. With growth projections for the US workforce of 4.4% from 2013-2017, it is also predicted that there will be accelerated turnover in many organizations.  Employees are expensive to attract and train, so losing employees to competitors can prove very costly. Accordingly, it makes sense for companies to have clear strategies to retain valued employees, by providing them with the information and tools they need to continue to grow – both in terms of their skill sets and their career progression. Clearly the more skills an employee has, the more valuable and attractive they are to both your organization and your competitors’ organizations. Whilst there is a lot of discussion about “Talent Management”, this all-encompassing term covers many different components of attracting, developing and managing employees.  “Career Management” or “Career Development” more specifically covers the steps an employee needs…

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contract-management

In most organizations, HR has come a long way since the filing cabinets stuffed full of employee resumes, appraisals etc., but many systems in place today are legacy systems that simply transferred those paper processes onto a computer.  Hiring decisions may have been made based on these files, but often in isolation from any other information used by HR. For a long time job roles have been defined by HR leaders and managers to define the “ideal” profile and skill-set for particular role, but this has often been built on assumptions based on past profiles, rather than applying any serious analysis to it. The transparency revolution has greatly increased the amount of information easily available on employees and candidates, with sites like LinkedIn having millions of detailed profiles that are largely publicly searchable, so there’s plenty of data out there to start analyzing. This makes it all the more surprising…

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muhammadali

Is arrogance an overlooked skill? If I am arrogant, is that a good or bad thing? Of course arrogance is bad, but is it a necessary evil in the rise of an executive? Subjectively I can conclude that I see this vice more in conversations with managers and executives than I do with employees. Are we born with arrogance? Or is it an environmental bi product of career achievement? Is arrogance directional? In other words are we only arrogant with people we feel we can be arrogant with? Enough questions lets look at an example. One of my former managers was significantly arrogant. She seemed to take pleasure in asserting her position to her staff and peers and at the same time letting us know that our opinions were less than important. I attended several meetings where she was presenting to her managers and, surprise surprise, her arrogance was no-where…

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moneyballmetric

In Moneyball, Brad Pitt discovers that the key to building a winning baseball team is to assess player talent differently than anyone has ever done it before. Turns out that the principles he discovers have value far beyond the baseball diamond. About Our Guest: Cathy Missildine-Martin is the co-founder of Intellectual Capital Consulting, a firm specializing in profitability through human capital.  She works closely with executives in the areas of performance, productivity, organizational metrics, training, employee and customer engagement, workforce planning, organizational design and strategic implementation.  Her experience in operations and sales management in the technical, insurance and hospitality industries has given her a broad understanding of business issues and a solid foundation for building performance enhancing systems that support the business. Her client list includes such names as the Intercontinental Hotels Group, IBM, Hampton Inns, and the United Way. Cathy is currently serving as President-Elect for the Society for…

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kasonTN

As intellectual capital has become the dominant competitive factor in many (if not most) businesses, companies are scrambling to get the people with the right skills and knowledge. While unemployment remains a harrowing problem for too many workers, others find themselves at the center of an ongoing war for talent. Who are the combatants in this war? What’s at stake? Human Performance expert Kason Morris joins us to discuss. About Our Guest Kason Morris is an accomplished consultant and manager of change management, diversity, talent management and training projects with  experience focused on developing and improving Human Performance, designing processes and managing organization transitions in Financial Services, Government, Retail, and Media & Entertainment. He specializes in Evaluating Human Performance  and Diversity programs; troubleshooting to isolate the causes of performance gaps and organizational needs; and conceptualizing and designing training, marketing and analysis materials. Kason received his Master’s in Business and Workplace…

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Andy Porter at Fistful of Talent says counter-offers are always a bad idea. They’re bad for the company and they’re bad for the individuals who accept them. How so? Well, for the employee it’s a matter of too little too late. By the time you’ve got a job offer in hand, things have probably gone past the point where the company make it all better with a little extra money. The money is nice, but any and all other problems that had you looking in the first place are probably still there. Generally it’s better to take the new offer you have and make a fresh start. For the company, it’s important to remember that a counter-offer rarely happens in a vacuum. Once employees get the idea that they can snare some additional compensation by putting themselves on the market, they will do so. This is dangerous because of the…

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lazarussquare

Emilie Wapnick at Brazen Life thinks that there is too much emphasis on specialization these days. She has written an entertaining piece with the provocative title Specialization is Overrated: Why You’ll Benefit from Being Kinda Good at Many Things. She makes a pretty good case, citing instances where skills that were not her true specialty were enough to get her through. Being “kinda good” at legal stuff was sufficient to secure a trademark. Being “kinda good” at CSS got her up and running on WordPress. I like the idea that we should all be generalists. I’ve always liked this passage from the Notebooks of Lazarus Long: A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve…

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pcaprojectmanager

This is a big day for me as I finally get to blog about something that I’ve been eager to talk about for a while now. As noted over on our sister blog,  Zapoint is today introducing a set of web-based tools for personal career analysis. These tools are available for free for anyone who wants to use them at Zapoint’s job board site, Jobster.com. We’re describing Personal Career Analytics (PCA) as a kind of “credit report” for your career. Like a credit report, PCA shows you where you stand against the rest of the workforce (using the Zapoint career network database as a fair representation of the workforce overall) and, perhaps more importantly, how you stack up against those with backgrounds and experience similar to yours. Let’s take a look at how PCA works. It starts with a dashboard that let’s me analyze either my work experience or skills,…

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careerpath

As noted over on the Zapoint blog, Hannah Glover writing at the Financial Times blog Ignites (access requires paid subscription) cites some eye-opening figures from an employee survey by Blessing White in which more than 10,000 workers were interviewed on the subject of retention: Having a strong career path was the second-most cited reason for employees to want to stay with a company. (Only enjoying one’s work was cited more frequently as a reason for wanting to stay.) Lacking a strong career path was the most frequent answer given for why employees choose to leave. This is one of those things that really ought to be obvious, but for whatever reason is not: people stick with situations, or don’t, based on a perceived future. Few of us would leave a football game late in the fourth quarter if our team was down by  three points and moving the ball effectively….

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