/blog > Resumes

lifechart9

From a recent Wall Street Journal article: No More Résumés, Say Some Firms Instead of asking for résumés, the New York venture-capital firm—which has invested in Twitter, Foursquare, Zynga and other technology companies—asked applicants to send links representing their “Web presence,” such as a Twitter account or Tumblr blog. Applicants also had to submit short videos demonstrating their interest in the position. Union Square says its process nets better-quality candidates —especially for a venture-capital operation that invests heavily in the Internet and social-media—and the firm plans to use it going forward to fill analyst positions and other jobs. So what replaces the resume? Summarizing one’s social media presence is an interesting idea, as is having people do a short video. These can be quite good and, er, not so good. (Got to love the guy who held up the complete works of Shakespeare to demonstrate how imminently employable he is.)…

Read More…

Some people are more comfortable showing their resumes than others.

Resumes are like belly buttons: everybody has one, we generally only show them to others under fairly specific circumstances, and they tend to gather lint if not properly attended to. Okay, well maybe not that last part. Let’s try again. Resumes are like S.O.’s: everybody has one, sometimes you run into an old one where you least expect to find it, and you’re constantly fighting with them about the default configuration of the toilet seat. Darn, these things seem to fall apart on that third item. How about… Resumes are like haircuts: everybody has one, the good ones don’t last for long, and  the bad ones seem to take forever to grow back out. Closer, but still not exactly there. Okay, so what exactly are resumes like? Leave your own formulation in the comments. Chris Twyman and I discuss resumes on this week’s Transparency Revolution audio edition. Join us for…

Read More…