/blog > Performance Management

Last week, Towers Watson’s Global Workforce Study reported that Career Management Programs are missing the mark, with many employees feeling that their companies are not adequately supporting or providing visibility of career development opportunities. It seems strange that many organizations report challenges around staff retention, but are not helping employees to identify opportunities to develop their skills and careers within the organization. The result is that, often after significant investment in training, companies are losing valuable employees to competitors. Often it’s not until the employee hands in their notice to leave that their managers express surprise and say they were going to be earmarked for a promotion some time soon. Technology enables us to make so many processes at work more efficient and transparent, but career management initiatives are often antiquated and secretive, being managed as succession planning initiatives that are often invisible to the employees, who feel they’re not…

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coot

As most regular readers and /or podcast subscribers know, I work for Zapoint, a company that sells “self-directed career management software.” What this means, very briefly, is that many talent management functions normally performed by HR are performed by the employees themselves, including identifying skills gaps, setting a career path, etc. Although such a solution can be implemented with various levels of organizational oversight and control, the whole idea still makes some managers uneasy…to say the least. So we get the odd uncomfortable joke about the monkeys running the zoo or the inmates running the asylum, all of which is par for the course. Still, even among managers who have enthusiastically adopted our approach, I wonder how many are ready for this? Why Employees Should Decide Who Gets Bonuses At both Linden Lab and his new company Coffee & Power, Philip Rosedale took a radical approach to bonuses: He let…

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grim_reaper3

While the debate about raising the debt ceiling continues, Nick Gillespie at Reason has identified the most effective HR manager working for the US government. He’s a real killer! Death is the Most Effective H.R. Manager for Federal Employees From USA Today, an analysis of just how tough it is to get canned if you’re a federal employee: Death — rather than poor performance, misconduct or layoffs — is the primary threat to job security at theEnvironmental Protection Agency, the Small Business Administration, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Office of Management and Budget and a dozen other federal operations. The federal government fired 0.55% of its workers in the budget year that ended Sept. 30 — 11,668 employees in its 2.1 million workforce. Research shows that the private sector fires about 3% of workers annually for poor performance, says John Palguta, former research chief at the federal…

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Sullivan 2

Some topics are naturally divisive and are bound to lead to strong disagreements. Anything having to do with religion, politics, or the Designated Hitter Rule would fall into that category. Other topics just seem to bring people together. Cute kittens. The weather — good or bad, we seem to cluster around a consensus opinion. Long waits at the airport. And then, of course, there’s performance appraisals. Everybody hates them. The people giving them hate them. The people getting them hate them. Having to do both is the worst. In my quest for the exalted status of Hashtag Ninja, I did a series of tweets yesterday around the #PerformanceAppraisals hashtag — really just links to several stories I happened upon dealing with performance management generally and performance appraisals in particular. 911 Is a Joke … And So Are Most Performance Assessments High Potentials vs. High Performers Should Employees Do Self-Appraisals? Performance…

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