/blog > Organizations

contract-management

In most organizations, HR has come a long way since the filing cabinets stuffed full of employee resumes, appraisals etc., but many systems in place today are legacy systems that simply transferred those paper processes onto a computer.  Hiring decisions may have been made based on these files, but often in isolation from any other information used by HR. For a long time job roles have been defined by HR leaders and managers to define the “ideal” profile and skill-set for particular role, but this has often been built on assumptions based on past profiles, rather than applying any serious analysis to it. The transparency revolution has greatly increased the amount of information easily available on employees and candidates, with sites like LinkedIn having millions of detailed profiles that are largely publicly searchable, so there’s plenty of data out there to start analyzing. This makes it all the more surprising…

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peter-thiel

Peter Thiel is no big fan of Twitter. He started an investment fund with the motto, “We were promised flying cars, and instead what we got was 140 characters,” indicating his dissatisfaction at the level of innovation that a company like Twitter represents. Even so, he believes that the company’s $10 billion current evaluation is “about right.” And he has more confidence in its future than he does some other organizations: Peter Thiel: Twitter will outlast the New York Times In a debate with Andreessen at the Milken Institute Global Conference Monday, Thiel, a co-founder of PayPal, said he expects that Twitter’s roughly 1,000 employees will have jobs a decade from now. The business case for Twitter is solid, Thiel said. He contrasted the future of Twitter with that of The New York Times, a print media vanguard that he says is not guaranteed a future in the digital age….

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organization

An unusual take, to say the least, from Seth Godin: The purpose of the modern organization is to make it easy and natural and expected for people to take risks. To lean out of the boat. To be human. Alas, most organizations do the opposite. They institutionalize organized cowardice. They give their people cover, a place to hide, a chance to say, “that’s not my job.” I love this answer and I wish I could agree with it. But I don’t see how organizations came to exist in order to make it easy for people to take risks. Organizations exist because there are certain things that individuals, even when they’re motivated and cooperating with each other, can’t do very effectively as individuals. Organizations exist as a kind of meta-person, which is the origin of the legal notion — recently the subject of much dispute — that a corporation is, legally,…

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helpinghands

In a recent TED talk, Dan Palotta boldly makes the case for non-profits, charities in particular, to spend a lot more money on overhead, including executives’ salaries. Palotta’s argument is based not on a love for bloated marketing budgets, but rather a belief that the same kinds of approaches and incentives that deliver significant results for business will work for charities. He believes that praising a charity for keeping costs down misses the point — the question we should be asking is how much good is the organization really doing? The standard we should be holding nonprofits to, he argues, is how big is its mission and how effective is it in carrying out that mission? Pallotta claims that our discomfort with large non-profit outlays for overhead is a holdover from our Puritan ancestors. Possibly. But there is something worrying about discovering that 70% of funds collected in some recent…

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p_office_people

I was talking to a former colleague today who is in the final stages of interviewing to join a start-up, because he said it’s “way too slow and boring” working for the large company that currently employs him. This sentiment is common among Gen Y employees, who seek fun and challenging experiences at work and see frequent job and career change as the new norm.   In a recent post, Key Consulting Group says that many Gen Y works think that traditional career paths in large corporations are dead end streets that are really not going to get them motivated. The result is that many large organizations are concerned about who their future leaders might be, as baby-boomers are retiring and many of the younger generation lack the necessary skills and experience to fill their boots.   The Key Consulting Group post goes on to say: “One report in the…

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