/blog > Empowerment

The quality of the talent within an organization and the ability to retain that talent provides corporations a powerful competitive advantage. Additionally, research shows that well‐trained employees are more productive, more engaged and remain loyal to the company. Therefore, it is no surprise that companies devote a lot of time, effort and money to corporate learning. According to the American Society for Training and Development, U.S. firms spent about $156 billion on employee learning and development in 2011. Although most organizations have internal training programs, for those who rely on external providers, formal training is costly and typically requires paid time off for the employee. More and more companies are utilizing online learning as a cost-effective alternative to traditional training programs for its flexible schedule, easy access to courses and more time efficient way for employees to expand their skills and knowledge. However, despite the focus on training, most companies…

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War on talent

Most companies recognize the value in attracting and retaining the right employees. With growth projections for the US workforce of 4.4% from 2013-2017, it is also predicted that there will be accelerated turnover in many organizations.  Employees are expensive to attract and train, so losing employees to competitors can prove very costly. Accordingly, it makes sense for companies to have clear strategies to retain valued employees, by providing them with the information and tools they need to continue to grow – both in terms of their skill sets and their career progression. Clearly the more skills an employee has, the more valuable and attractive they are to both your organization and your competitors’ organizations. Whilst there is a lot of discussion about “Talent Management”, this all-encompassing term covers many different components of attracting, developing and managing employees.  “Career Management” or “Career Development” more specifically covers the steps an employee needs…

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learners

Last week I attended Corporate Learning Week in Orlando. I attended a number of interesting sessions about how to engage employees and innovate the learning process and also spoke to many executives about learning practices and initiatives in their organizations. What was clear was that there is not a shortage of learning content out there, in all sorts of different formats, but many organizations struggle with finding the best way to deliver (and encourage) learning in order to engage their employees. Recent blog posts  by Jane Hart and Norene Wiesen on unwilling learners and how people learn through explaining their thinking respectively make it clear that different learning approaches work for different people, but employees need to understand the motivation for learning. When learners are directed to consume training content, they’re often doing it because they know they have to do it to tick a box, rather than because they…

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vintagesecretary

Because it was intended to determine qualifications for secretaries and because it comes to us from the primitive and barbaric year 1959, this list of self-qualifying behaviors for “business work” is presented by Slate as a curiosity, and evidence of a business culture that devalued and discriminated against women.  And perhaps it is that, but I see something more here. If today, living in the enlightened times we enjoy, one were to put together a list of good characteristics for, say, a consultant, how different would it be from this list? You might need one additional item about assertively, but not obnoxiously, leading a client to understand things about the organization that they currently aren’t seeing. But then, really, that’s item 8, isn’t it? Let’s try another job: how about a management position? The only thing missing from the list is “Getting people to do what needs to be done”…

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BuckminsterFullerquote

Found this on Facebook, the work of Bannerthoughts. Fuller’s call for the emergence of new models applies across the board — in business, government, and our personal lives. One of the difficult things about making progress in any of these dimensions is that we (and so many others) have so much invested in the models that need to be made obsolete. Even if the benefits of a new approach are obvious, an entrenched status quo is a hard thing to displace. But we must! UPDATE: My exchange with Bob in the comments got me thinking that it’s not enough to say that models need to be made obsolete. We need to say which models. With that in mind, here’s this week’s Friday Poll, a day early in honor of Buckminster Fuller, a man who was truly ahead of his time. Online Surveys – Zoomerang.comRead More…

…RIM (the maker of Blackberry) has just found out in the most public way. An anonymous letter from an unmotivated employee was published online and has been circling the web. It is a letter from the heart and has been sent out of desperation and frustration. Talent Management at RIM is failing because it is a process that works from the top down and takes no account of culture or organizational demand. RIM SHOULD BE TALKING TO ZAPOINT. Enjoy: To the RIM Senior Management Team: I have lost confidence. While I hide it at work, my passion has been sapped. I know I am not alone — the sentiment is widespread and it includes people within your own teams. Mike and Jim, please take the time to really absorb and digest the content of this letter because it reflects the feeling across a huge percentage of your employee base. You…

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marshallzhang

We each have a lot to learn about how big a difference we truly can make. The sooner we all start figuring this out, and putting it into practice, the better.Read More…