/blog > Career Management

Last week, Towers Watson’s Global Workforce Study reported that Career Management Programs are missing the mark, with many employees feeling that their companies are not adequately supporting or providing visibility of career development opportunities. It seems strange that many organizations report challenges around staff retention, but are not helping employees to identify opportunities to develop their skills and careers within the organization. The result is that, often after significant investment in training, companies are losing valuable employees to competitors. Often it’s not until the employee hands in their notice to leave that their managers express surprise and say they were going to be earmarked for a promotion some time soon. Technology enables us to make so many processes at work more efficient and transparent, but career management initiatives are often antiquated and secretive, being managed as succession planning initiatives that are often invisible to the employees, who feel they’re not…

Read More…

Contrary to what many people think, a leader is not someone who creates followers. Instead, as my mother puts it, a true leader is someone who creates new leaders. Leadership comes in many forms. You don’t have to be on the organization’s executive team to be a leader.  According to Tony Robbins, “A leader is someone who inspires others to become more of who they truly are. They bring out the greatness that lies within each human being, and enables individuals to put that greatness into practice consistently. Leaders inspire themselves and others to do, be, give, and become more than they ever thought possible, thereby creating more leaders in the process.” Today, more than ever, there is a need for true leadership in the workplace in order to build high performing organizations with committed employees, loyal customers and followers, and increased performance and sustainability.  Below, are several leadership qualities…

Read More…

War on talent

Most companies recognize the value in attracting and retaining the right employees. With growth projections for the US workforce of 4.4% from 2013-2017, it is also predicted that there will be accelerated turnover in many organizations.  Employees are expensive to attract and train, so losing employees to competitors can prove very costly. Accordingly, it makes sense for companies to have clear strategies to retain valued employees, by providing them with the information and tools they need to continue to grow – both in terms of their skill sets and their career progression. Clearly the more skills an employee has, the more valuable and attractive they are to both your organization and your competitors’ organizations. Whilst there is a lot of discussion about “Talent Management”, this all-encompassing term covers many different components of attracting, developing and managing employees.  “Career Management” or “Career Development” more specifically covers the steps an employee needs…

Read More…

learners

Last week I attended Corporate Learning Week in Orlando. I attended a number of interesting sessions about how to engage employees and innovate the learning process and also spoke to many executives about learning practices and initiatives in their organizations. What was clear was that there is not a shortage of learning content out there, in all sorts of different formats, but many organizations struggle with finding the best way to deliver (and encourage) learning in order to engage their employees. Recent blog posts  by Jane Hart and Norene Wiesen on unwilling learners and how people learn through explaining their thinking respectively make it clear that different learning approaches work for different people, but employees need to understand the motivation for learning. When learners are directed to consume training content, they’re often doing it because they know they have to do it to tick a box, rather than because they…

Read More…

jumper

So often people have no idea what career they really want to follow. The advice from this video is simple – do whatever interests you and makes you happy. If you really like what you’re doing, you’ll become a master of it, and there’s always someone interested in paying you for what you’ve mastered. If you’re doing something you hate you’re never going to get the reward you want, or as the video puts it: “It’s all retch and no vomit”.  Read More…

p_office_people

I was talking to a former colleague today who is in the final stages of interviewing to join a start-up, because he said it’s “way too slow and boring” working for the large company that currently employs him. This sentiment is common among Gen Y employees, who seek fun and challenging experiences at work and see frequent job and career change as the new norm.   In a recent post, Key Consulting Group says that many Gen Y works think that traditional career paths in large corporations are dead end streets that are really not going to get them motivated. The result is that many large organizations are concerned about who their future leaders might be, as baby-boomers are retiring and many of the younger generation lack the necessary skills and experience to fill their boots.   The Key Consulting Group post goes on to say: “One report in the…

Read More…

Time is money

Is it true that more and more men, even lawyers,  are unwilling to sacrifice personal time for professional goals? I have a close friend who comes out of a large law firm who expected him to commit 80 hours a week. I showed him this article. He viewed the article with a certain level of skepticism. Anne C. Weisberg, a talent director for Deloitte, explains in the article how and why their organization has instituted a cutting-edge approach to the work environment called Mass Career Customization. It includes the following points: Changing family structure. Department of Labor statistics reveal that in 83 percent of households both the husband and wife are now in the workforce. Increased numbers of women workers. Looking at the legal profession alone, women make up at least half of law students—yet personal versus professional demands and the lack of career satisfaction lead many of them to leave…

Read More…

fredturner

McDonalds legendary CEO Fred Turner started life as a grill cook in an outlet in Illinois and worked his way right to the top. On that journey he also invented the McNugget, a fact my son is ever thankful for. This rapid rise from customer facing minion to leading one of the largest enterprises in the world inspires many to strive for progress within the large companies they work in. BUT this example is absolutely the exception and not the rule. Matthew Gwyther is editor of Management Today and says “Most large firms expect their executives to spend a week or two on the shop floor to learn how the business works – and that is more than enough.” Brian Wheeler of BBC News Magazine adds: There are plenty of examples of executives who have worked their way up from humble beginnings, particularly in industries such as retail and catering…

Read More…

phdsonfoodstamps

This infographic from onlinecolleges.net, America’s PhDs on food stamps, highlights an important (if troubling) reality: if ever there was a time that simply staying in school or generally pushing ahead with gathering credentials guaranteed economic viability, that time has passed. Simply put, it’s not enough to have a PhD, or a law degree, or an MD, or to become a CPA, or even to get your GED, for that matter — your skills, experience, and credentials have to be aligned with work that someone is willing to pay you to do. Without that, it’s all for nothing. Please include attribution to OnlineColleges.net with this graphic. Choosing a career path can’t be strictly about applying your aptitudes and passion… at least, not if you intend to make a living from that career. Is there a market for your current set of skills and experience? Are companies hiring people with the credentials…

Read More…

bull_by_horns2

The Mayans were wrong and 2013 has started relatively uneventfully. Most of us are back at work, so now is a good time to take stock and consider what you want to achieve in your career in 2013.   Forget about not drinking for a month and instead think about what went well and what could have gone better in 2012, and consider how to make 2013 a productive year for your career.   This doesn’t have to be too onerous a task, with lofty goals set for the whole year. As Adrian Granzella Larssen suggests in ‘5 Career Resolutions Everyone Should Make in 2013’, this could be as simple as resolving to add some new skills to your resume this year by taking a course, or making a list of what didn’t make you happy in your job last year, and thinking about what you might do to avoid the…

Read More…