/blog > Career Analysis

As a human resources professional, one of your most important jobs is screening prospective employees to determine if their skills and personality will mesh with your company’s corporate culture. But that can be hard to do. Sometimes the applicant whose resume appears perfect on paper doesn’t measure up to his or her written word. Another job seeker may come across as gregarious, friendly and knowledgeable during a face-to-face interview, but may not “fit in” with his colleagues after being hired. And there’s nothing worse than realizing  90 days after a new hire comes aboard that made a mistake.Read More…

contract-management

In most organizations, HR has come a long way since the filing cabinets stuffed full of employee resumes, appraisals etc., but many systems in place today are legacy systems that simply transferred those paper processes onto a computer.  Hiring decisions may have been made based on these files, but often in isolation from any other information used by HR. For a long time job roles have been defined by HR leaders and managers to define the “ideal” profile and skill-set for particular role, but this has often been built on assumptions based on past profiles, rather than applying any serious analysis to it. The transparency revolution has greatly increased the amount of information easily available on employees and candidates, with sites like LinkedIn having millions of detailed profiles that are largely publicly searchable, so there’s plenty of data out there to start analyzing. This makes it all the more surprising…

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lazarussquare

Emilie Wapnick at Brazen Life thinks that there is too much emphasis on specialization these days. She has written an entertaining piece with the provocative title Specialization is Overrated: Why You’ll Benefit from Being Kinda Good at Many Things. She makes a pretty good case, citing instances where skills that were not her true specialty were enough to get her through. Being “kinda good” at legal stuff was sufficient to secure a trademark. Being “kinda good” at CSS got her up and running on WordPress. I like the idea that we should all be generalists. I’ve always liked this passage from the Notebooks of Lazarus Long: A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve…

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lifefordummies

At her Forbes blog, Susannah Breslin has an interview with Len Kendall, one of the founders of gist.to, a company that takes long-form web-content and summarizes it in 200 words or less. She describes this as “Cliff’s Notes for the Internet.” Kendall does not shy away from the description in the least:Read More…

franksinatra

In keeping with our discussion of Murray’s Law on today’s TR Audio Edition podcast, here’s a quick self-test that can give you a pretty clear of how successful you are and whether you are achieving your own, or someone else’s, definition of success. Online Surveys Oh, and for you younger readers who don’t get that bit about the Chairman, here’s some essential background (Warning: includes a highly Sinatra-typical / politically incorrect reference to Paul Anka.)  Read More…

pcaprojectmanager

This is a big day for me as I finally get to blog about something that I’ve been eager to talk about for a while now. As noted over on our sister blog,  Zapoint is today introducing a set of web-based tools for personal career analysis. These tools are available for free for anyone who wants to use them at Zapoint’s job board site, Jobster.com. We’re describing Personal Career Analytics (PCA) as a kind of “credit report” for your career. Like a credit report, PCA shows you where you stand against the rest of the workforce (using the Zapoint career network database as a fair representation of the workforce overall) and, perhaps more importantly, how you stack up against those with backgrounds and experience similar to yours. Let’s take a look at how PCA works. It starts with a dashboard that let’s me analyze either my work experience or skills,…

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