/blog > Analysis

No return

We frequently hear about the importance of a Return on Investment (ROI) to justify a decision being made to proceed down a certain path, especially when implementing a new technology. Clearly there are some systems for which there’s a clear ROI, such as replacing a completely manual process with an automated system (that may actually replace a person or people), or replacing existing training with an equivalent that’s cheaper. However, how many companies end up not implementing an innovative technology that may result in huge benefits, because they can’t assign an exact dollar value to that implementation? The areas in which a system may add value or benefits may be clear, but assigning a monetary value to that benefit may not be. For example, you might assume that a new applicant tracking system that automates and innovates some processes will add value, but how many of the efficiency improvements are…

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contract-management

In most organizations, HR has come a long way since the filing cabinets stuffed full of employee resumes, appraisals etc., but many systems in place today are legacy systems that simply transferred those paper processes onto a computer.  Hiring decisions may have been made based on these files, but often in isolation from any other information used by HR. For a long time job roles have been defined by HR leaders and managers to define the “ideal” profile and skill-set for particular role, but this has often been built on assumptions based on past profiles, rather than applying any serious analysis to it. The transparency revolution has greatly increased the amount of information easily available on employees and candidates, with sites like LinkedIn having millions of detailed profiles that are largely publicly searchable, so there’s plenty of data out there to start analyzing. This makes it all the more surprising…

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