/blog > archive > September 2012

socialskills

What is keeping abundant available applicants from filling the many jobs that are currently out there and not being filled? An eye-opening assessment from Nick Schulz in the Wall Street Journal: …[C]onsiderable evidence suggests that many employers would be happy just to find job applicants who have the sort of “soft” skills that used to be almost taken for granted. In the Manpower Group’s 2012 Talent Shortage Survey, nearly 20% of employers cited a lack of soft skills as a key reason they couldn’t hire needed employees. “Interpersonal skills and enthusiasm/motivation” were among the most commonly identified soft skills that employers found lacking. Employers also mention a lack of elementary command of the English language. A survey in April of human-resources professionals conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management and the AARP compared the skills gap between older workers who were nearing retirement and younger workers coming into the…

Read More…

wrongnumbers

Anyone who has endeavored to get or remain healthy knows how misleading numbers can be. Is your weight a good indicator of health? Absent any other data, it’s better than nothing. But BMI tells you more and body fat percentage more still. Likewise “high cholesterol” can be bad or good depending on whether you’re looking at the LDL or HDL figure. So it is also with trying to make sense of the numbers related to employment and the economy: The good news — payrolls increase, unemployment takes (very) a slight dip. The bad news — the work force (as measured in terms of how much of the overall population is participating in it) is smaller than ever. The two linked items go together in an interesting way, driven by relationships among the numbers cited. With a smaller work force it takes fewer and fewer jobs created to diminish the official…

Read More…

stockclerk

If you’re a millenial, and you’re working, chances are your job is in retail: The most common jobs held by Gen Y are merchandise displayer and sales representative, which they are about five times more likely to hold vs. all workers, shows a PayScale analysis of about 500,000 profiles submitted to the company in the past year by Millennials ages 19-30. Is this bad news? Speaking from my own experience, I was a retail stock clerk while in high school — kids used to hold down jobs while in high school; not sure how much that goes on any more — and then again, briefly, after graduating from college. Actually, that was one of my better post-graduation jobs. I also worked in a video store and a sub shop and was a bus boy for a while at a nice hotel restaurant. The difference between then and now is that…

Read More…