/blog > archive > February 2012

Larry-Stybel

NOTE: due to my travel schedule we’re not doing a Transparency Revolution podcast this week. So I thought this would be a good time to dip into the archives and replay one of my favorite shows from last year. If you’re not familiar with Murray’s Law, you’ll want to give this a listen. And if you are familiar…well, a little reminder couldn’t hurt. — This week we explore a topic which lies at the heart of every show we’ve done in this series. The topic is success — success on our own terms. We take a look at  Murray’s Law for success. To guide us, we welcome the man who introduced Murray’s law, Larry Stybel, who explains how he came by the inspiration for this law along with setting out it’s three major principles: 1. Are you positioning yourself so that one day, you do not have to work? 2….

Read More…

Des_Moines_skyline_night

Forbes reports that the best job markets in the US are Washington, DC and Des Moines, Iowa: Looking for a good, high-paying job? Over the next four years, the Washington, D.C. area is expected to add more than a quarter of a million of them, putting it at the top of this year’s Forbes list of the Best Cities for Jobs. Washington’s performance shouldn’t be much of a surprise, since the steadily increasing power of the federal government has long drawn defense contractors, lawyers and lobbyists to the nation’s capital. Now that Obamacare has put another 17% of the U.S. economy under the firm control of federal bureaucrats, expect a new wave of moving vans bringing highly-paid healthcare executives to Washington’s expensive suburbs. With a median household income of $88,600, Washington ranks only behind the San Jose, Calif. area when it comes to salaries. Number Two on our list might be…

Read More…

learning

Research shows that positive reinforcement for being right is not nearly the help towards learning that we thought it would be . (No doubt it helps towards self-esteem, but that’s a different matter.) What really helps us to learn is realizing that we’re wrong. In fact, reinforcement that we are wrong is the key.  [U]nless we experience the unpleasant symptoms of being wrong — that surge of Pe activity a few hundred milliseconds after the error, directing our attention to the very thing we’d like to ignore — the mind will never revise its models. We’ll keep on making the same mistakes, forsaking self-improvement for the sake of self-confidence. Samuel Beckett had the right attitude: “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.” We learn best when we learn to fail better. Cross-posted from Better All the Time.Read More…

helpwantedasterisk

Please forgive my delayed outrage but I only just saw this story from two years ago and I feel, owing to some of the other topics we’ve been covering, that it deserves a little attention. Okay, so here’s the deal: Employer told not to post advert for ‘reliable’ workers because it discriminates against ‘unreliable’ applicants When it comes to hiring staff, there are plenty of legal pitfalls employers need to watch out for these days. So recruitment agency boss Nicole Mamo was especially careful to ensure her advert for hospital workers did not offend on grounds of race, age or sexual orientation. However, she hadn’t reckoned on discriminating against a wholly different section of the community – the completely useless. When she ran the ad past a job centre, she was told she couldn’t ask for ‘reliable’ and ‘hard-working’ applicants because it could be offensive to unreliable people. Okay, there…

Read More…

Daniel_KAHNEMAN

In this fascinating TED Talk, Daniel Kahneman explains the difference between happiness as it is known to the Experiencing Self versus happiness as it is known to the Remembering Self. The Remembering self responds to stories which are all about change, significant moments, and endings. So we might view an overall positive experience that ended badly as a negative experience, or a negative experience that ended well as a good experience. Here by “positive” and “negative” experiences we just mean experiences during which we predominantly experience positive or negative emotions. Kahneman gives the example of a really nice two-week vacation. To the experiencing self, such a vacation is twice as good as a one-week vacation, but to the remembering self it is only slightly better, seeing as nothing much changes and it ends the same either way. Another example involves a person moving from Ohio to California to enjoy the…

Read More…

sisko-facepalm

I’ve been hard on hiring companies and recruiters over the past few months for employing candidate screening and job interview tactics that I think are unfair, silly, and just plain bad business. But it’s important to note that these criticisms do not let the interviewee off the hook in any way. So in the spirit of equal time, I direct you to CareerBuilder’s survey of boneheaded things that job candidates do. Let’s begin with the basics: Answering cell phone or texting Appearing disinterested Dressing inappropriately Appearing arrogant Talking negatively about current or previous employers Chewing gum Seriously? Adults who need jobs? Every item on that list is worthy of a full-on face palm (and, sorry, “not knowing how” to dress appropriately is no excuse.) Unfortunately, I don’t think my delicate features can handle so much abuse. So let’s use the honors system. If you have ever done any of those…

Read More…

abundance

Abundance by Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler is available today. A book that explains how and why the world is getting better is right up my alley, anyhow, but I really like the timing because I think this news make a nice counterpoint to some of our recent topics, including asking whether robots are about to steal our jobs. Also, I just last week launched a new blog that is thematically related to this book. Diamandis’ and Kotke’s arguments will be happily accepted by a few and hotly debated by almost everyone else. Most of our political discourse is based on the idea that the world is getting worse and doom is imminent. Plus that’s the basic message that media makes its money on. How can anyone argue that we’re heading in a good direction? Jason Silva here gives a good quick introduction: I have pre-ordered my copy and so…

Read More…

heartattackgrill

The founder of the Heart Attack Grill is unrepentant about the ongoing operation of his medically themed burger restaurant in the face of a patron being wheeled out of their Las Vegas location with chest pains after downing a Triple Bypass burger. If we can find nothing else commendable about this institution, we’ve got to give them transparency — not to mention delivery on what might otherwise have been taken for marketing hype. The joint says it’ll give you a heart attack right there in the name. And, by golly, it delivers! You know, if they have one of those “Better than Sex” cakes on the dessert menu, they can expect a sharp uptick in business.Read More…

smiley2

This seems like a good subject for a movie.Very interesting comment in the beginning: a psychology student asks why his instructors tell him you can never measure happiness — when they seemed perfectly comfortable measuring depression! Happy – A Documentary Trailer from Wadi Rum Films on Vimeo. Happiness is a serious subject, deserving of serious attention. It’s great that it’s starting to get the attention it deserves.Read More…

whiskeyandthemoon

Why do creative types, writers in particular, have the reputation for lifestyles that are so at odds with the conventions associated with other occupations? Consider this quote from William Faulkner: The tools I need for my work are paper, tobacco, food, and a little whiskey. Does that sound like your job? He is also quoted as saying this: It’s a shame that the only thing a man can do for eight hours a day is work. He can’t eat for eight hours; he can’t drink for eight hours; he can’t make love for eight hours. The only thing a man can do for eight hours is work. By reputation, Faulkner disproved the notion that a man “can’t drink for eight hours” many times over. And note that it never occurred to him to that a man can, if he so chooses, at least attempt to sleep for eight hours. Booze. Late nights. Two of…

Read More…