/blog > archive > August 2011

watson

I wrote not long ago about how certain jobs are on the endangered species list. For all the angst we’ve experienced from outsourcing over the past couple decades, the real extinction threat for many if not most occupations (in the long run) is automation. Just ask your local travel agent. Futurist Martin Ford believes our current economic model is doomed. In his book The Lights in the Tunnel, he predicts that the economy will collapse when the vast majority of jobs disappear due to automation and there are no consumers left to drive demand for production. It’s a gloomy scenario, and most people won’t like his fixes — things like government checks for taking training or for engaging in behavior that’s good for the environment. But aren’t there certain things that can’t be automated? IBM’s Jeopardy-champ robot Watson may be going to medical school, but I think your family doctor’s…

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Some people are more comfortable showing their resumes than others.

Resumes are like belly buttons: everybody has one, we generally only show them to others under fairly specific circumstances, and they tend to gather lint if not properly attended to. Okay, well maybe not that last part. Let’s try again. Resumes are like S.O.’s: everybody has one, sometimes you run into an old one where you least expect to find it, and you’re constantly fighting with them about the default configuration of the toilet seat. Darn, these things seem to fall apart on that third item. How about… Resumes are like haircuts: everybody has one, the good ones don’t last for long, and  the bad ones seem to take forever to grow back out. Closer, but still not exactly there. Okay, so what exactly are resumes like? Leave your own formulation in the comments. Chris Twyman and I discuss resumes on this week’s Transparency Revolution audio edition. Join us for…

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usainupset

Weekend developments at the  2011 Track and Field World Championships in Daegu, South Korea provide some keen insights into the power of transparency. The big story Sunday was the 100-meter final — not the race itself, but the fact that superstar Usain Bolt was disqualified on a false start. The International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) has repeatedly changed the rules on allowable false starts over the years. At one time, every runner could have one false start in each race with no penalty. Later that was reduced to one total false start allowed per race. Today’s rule is that no false starts are ever permitted. That’s a pretty harsh rule, driven by logisitical and commercial concerns. It’s hard to keep an event on schedule when mutliple false starts occur. An event that is hard to keep on schedule is one that is hard to fit into a TV time…

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therents

At Fistful of Talent, Tim Sackett outlines the Number 1 Employee Recognition Tool of All Time. What is it? A note to your parents.Read More…

stevejobsapple2

At National Review Online, Nick Schulz waxes elegiac about the career of Steve Jobs, describing him as “America’s Greatest Failure” and noting that “Glory is sometimes born of catastrophe.” It may be a distinctly American practice, to write eulogies at the end of a career rather than a life — and here’s hoping even the career eulogies are premature, that Mr. Jobs finds a path to recovery from his illness and achieves another comeback or three before any real eulogies are written about him.Read More…

lifefordummies

At her Forbes blog, Susannah Breslin has an interview with Len Kendall, one of the founders of gist.to, a company that takes long-form web-content and summarizes it in 200 words or less. She describes this as “Cliff’s Notes for the Internet.” Kendall does not shy away from the description in the least:Read More…

passion

No, not that kind of passion. We’re talking about passion — that feeling of this is who I am and this is what I stand for. Does your passion have anything to do with your career?

Could it?

Should it?
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Anna-Hazare2

The problem of rampant government corruption is hardly unique to India. But taking a page from the Mahatma’s book and implementing a hunger strike to oppose it is a distinctly Indian approach.Read More…

lineforjobfair

I’ll add one more prediction to my list of possible characteristics of the job search of the future which I posted yesterday: 6. The market will continue to be highly competitive. This sort of thing can’t be very encouraging at all: Thousands of unemployed waited overnight, camping out in their business suits and office heels and braving the tormenting heat in Atlanta to stand in line for a job fair Thursday. Authorities treated 20 people for heat exhaustion as they struggled to keep the line moving and get people moved inside.  Read More…

futurenextexit

I’ve spent the past few months making my own humble contribution to adding an analytical layer to a job search site which we’ve also been working on making more interesting and social networkish. These initiatives have given me some time to think about how rapidly the process that we call “job hunting” is changing, both from the candidate’s and from the hiring manager’s perspective. Based on what I’ve learned working on these projects, and generally from posting to this blog every day, I’m prepared to make a few predictions about what job hunting will be like in the near future. 1. It will keep getting sillier, and probably won’t get any  more fair. Job candidates can continue to expect to be asked questions like, “How many bricks are there in Shanghai?” and “If you were the size of a pencil, how would you escape from a blender?” Once organizations decide…

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