/blog > archive > June 2011

frozenchicken

I bought a new plan for my mobile phone earlier today and had an interesting conversation with the customer service rep about what the word “unlimited” means on my unlimited data plan. (I’m still not 100% sure.)Read More…

davidlipscomb

Over the past few months we have looked at ways in which organizations seek to be open, authentic, ethical and at the same time more productive and efficient. In this two-part interview which will conclude next week, management consultant David Lipscomb outlines holistic approach to addressing all of these concerns (and more) within the organization by focusing on organizational sustainability in conjunction with accountability and transparency. In the first of two parts, David describes how sustainability is built from the foundation of an organization and upward (and outward.) Focusing first on leadership, then the workforce, followed by customers, and finally the supply chain and all other external relationships, an organization can imprint sustainability, accountability, and transparency into its “DNA,” ensuring that it has those qualities by default. About Our Guest David Lipscomb is the founder and CEO of Current Innovative Solutions.  CIS is a boutique management consulting practice focused on…

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richardbranson

It’s not really as man-bites-dog as you might think. The CEO advocating that people get more time off is not recommending it for his people, but rather for some unfortunates living in a foreign country. (I happen to be one of those unfortunates, as do most of you, according to my web stats.) Moreover, the CEO in question is Richard Branson. Here are some comments he made recently at the SHRM conference in Las Vegas: Workplace flexibility is critical for success, but American companies are particularly bad at it … many of your workers would like more flexibility — job sharing, part-time employment, a six-month leave of absence … and the number of holidays people are given in America stinks. It’s horrendous. The typical American response to that suggestion is to argue that American companies are more productive than European companies precisely because we have less time off — and…

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buggy2

Yahoo! finance lists 10 dying industries, including things you would expect like newspapers and fixed wireline telelphony along with a few eyebrow-raisers like tuxedo and costume rental. (Pardon me if formal wear rental is a much bigger industry than I realized, but I don’t see how it belongs on the same list as textile mills and video post-production.) To me the most interesting thing about this analysis is the underlying reason for the disappearance of each of these industries. Does anyone else see a trend, here? (Emphasis added in each example.) Video Postproduction Services Movie studios are moving post-production in house. Meanwhile, technological advances have boosted efficiency… Newspaper Publishing The move to online news and the competition from a plethora of new media information sources are obvious culprits. Apparel Manufacturing Cheap labor costs overseas, combined with consumers’ expectation for a bargain at home Textile Mills Cheap competition from abroad, which…

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tinyC

Get ready for the new small. What is it? BIG, of course. Big is the new small. Over the past few decades Moore’s law has enabled a drastic reduction in the physical space required to house a computing device. That’s the reason that today we can carry around a smart phone with massive computing power that we are able to use to perform myriad productive and / or recreational tasks. One drawback — as these devices have taken up less and less space, the space within which we interact with them has grown smaller and smaller. We have gone from looking at fairly large monitors to tiny little smart phone displays. We have gone from big desktop keyboards to much smaller laptop keyboards to tiny little Blackberry and iPhone keypads. And we’ve gone from great big fat chunky mice to cramped little trackpads to trying to make something happen in…

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checklist

Seth Godin presents a 36-item list that we should all go through before sending any email message. It’s not as bad as it sounds — if you’re not sending the message to a group, you automatically get to jump to Step 10.Read More…

wealthransfromed

The idea that reputation is an asset is beginning to resonate with more and more individuals and organizations. But can reputation every become a form of currency? Phil Bowermaster takes a look at a world where increasingly we record and quantify all of our activities, communication, and values. In such a world, the surprising answer to that question might well be…yes. Listen to internet radio with PhilBowermaster on Blog Talk Radio Join us live Wednesday June 22 at 2PM EDT / 11 AM PDT or access the show archive via the player above. If you’re having trouble with the player you can also listen at our page on Blog Talk Radio. Our music is Semi-Funk by Kevin MacLeodRead More…

109

This morning my oldest daughter had to drive to Greeley, Colorado (a couple of hours from where we live) to pick up her diploma from the University of Northern Colorado. I told her to be sure and stop by Starbucks on her way home. When she asked me why, I explained…
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P_culture_yellow

Reader “Redneck Smith” has provided an interesting comment on last week’s piece about Anonymity, Sock Puppetry, And Fraud. He suggests a layout with four quadrants to map various online personas, ranked according to whether the individual using the persona is using their own name and whether they are telling the truth.
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snapdeal2

We’ve talked a lot about corporate posturing over the past few months, and the challenges organizations face in trying to put their best foot forward while presenting an accurate picture of who they are and what they do. There are no pat formulas or easy answers to these challenges. Organizations need to look for the little signposts along the way. For example, if a town decides to rename itself after your company, that could indicate that you’re doing something right.
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