/blog > archive > May 2011

soul-sucking

Trying to get at the nexus between career and life, or say  between the working self and the whole self, is a pretty standard trope in the realm of career consulting / career advice. Less often do you hear any talk about how all this is impacting one’s “soul.” In her new ebook, The 7 Most Soul-Sucking Career Mistakes Ever (and How to Avoid Them) career guru Christine Livingston freely uses the s word (that’s soul, of course) in describing how our careers can disconnect us from who we are as people — and why you ought to be concerned about what your job is doing to your soul, whether you believe you have one or not. Christine joins us on this week’s audio edition of the Transparency Revolution. We discuss the major disconnect that often exists between what people value and what they do for a living…and what can…

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Picture 1

Every heard of AirBnB.com (Air Bed n Breakfast)? Forward thinking, start-up entrepruneur Brian Chesky has created a service that bridges the gap between travelers and ‘spare bedrooms’. Anyone can become a hotel for the night and anyone can book a room, with the only middleman being the website. That transparency has earned Chesky a $1bn valuation as he is raising $100m to fund the huge growth he is seeing. This is how airbnb works. Interesting that many tech savvy investors and even travel businesses passed on this investment as they didnt think people would want to offer their spare bedrooms. BUT Chesky’s bet paid off as airbnb has grown at over 800% per year since and has booked over 1.6m rooms. Transparency = $Read More…

Phil's Lifechart

There’s just something fundamentally funny about attempts to communicate gone wrong. It’s why we love these predictive / auto-correct exchanges so much. It’s why people have been passing around church bulletin bloopers forever. Some of these are too good to be true, but the request to “please use the back door” for people attending the Low Self-Esteem Workshop had to have happened. It just had to.Read More…

Linkedin

If you put a $100 note in your sock drawer in 2001 it would have been a better investment than if you had handed that same $100 to Steve Ballmer at Microsoft in return for his stock. Today Mr. Ballmer would have handed you back $96 and you would have looked at him in disbelief – “aren’t you Microsoft?”. Now jump in your time machine and go back 10 years. Take your $100 note out of your sock drawer and hand it to Reid Hoffman (founder of LinkedIn). Today Mr. Hoffman would be handing you $90,000 – “Thank you LinkedIn!”. Now Microsoft is much, much bigger than LinkedIn (today) and they do not compete at all. Microsoft has gone through its huge growth period and generated its millionaires but what happened in the last decade? One obvious difference between the two companies is their position on Transparency. LinkedIn is pure…

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Sullivan 2

Some topics are naturally divisive and are bound to lead to strong disagreements. Anything having to do with religion, politics, or the Designated Hitter Rule would fall into that category. Other topics just seem to bring people together. Cute kittens. The weather — good or bad, we seem to cluster around a consensus opinion. Long waits at the airport. And then, of course, there’s performance appraisals. Everybody hates them. The people giving them hate them. The people getting them hate them. Having to do both is the worst. In my quest for the exalted status of Hashtag Ninja, I did a series of tweets yesterday around the #PerformanceAppraisals hashtag — really just links to several stories I happened upon dealing with performance management generally and performance appraisals in particular. 911 Is a Joke … And So Are Most Performance Assessments High Potentials vs. High Performers Should Employees Do Self-Appraisals? Performance…

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TransparencyRevolutionLogo

In order to succeed, companies must build and maintain strong relationships with many different entities and individuals: employees, customers, suppliers, partners, government agencies, etc. How a company’s messages are received by other organizations can have a significant impact on these relationships. The need for clarity, openness, and transparency is as great, if not greater, between organizations as it is within them. We explore the challenges that organizations face in getting their messaging right in the B2B context, and the role that corporate history can play not only in improving messaging and increasing transparency, but also in optimizing business performance. About Our Guest Carla Johnson is the Principal with Type A Communications, operating nationwide out of the greater Denver area in Colorado. With a background in marketing, business development, public relations and employee communications, Carla guides companies in building relationships with employees, customers, prospects, the media, and online and offline communities….

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mexico_10

I love a good headline. You need just that perfect combination of deadpan seriousness and stating the obvious. I tweeted this one with the hashtag #shockingnews:

Traveling to Mexico on Sick Leave? It Can Get an Employee Fired

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SethHeadShot

This week we have been focused on exploding watermelons, humorous street sign addenda, and asking the all-important question WWBSD (What Would Bart Simpson Do?) Today we have something a little more serious to talk about: the meaning of life. Here it is in one minute: I’m intrigued by Seth’s description of his learning experience as waking from a slumber or cutting through a fog. Surely there can be no area where we need transparency more than in understanding what is truly important in our own lives.Read More…

Bart_Simpson

Transparent organizations tend to know what they know, and that is not a trivial thing. When an organization doesn’t know what it knows, or doesn’t know some of the things that that it should now — that is to say, when information that the organization owns and is responsible is no longer available within the organization — all manner of mischief can occur.Read More…

noparking

Sometimes information provided is perfectly clear without addressing all of the most significant implications. Here’s a terrific example of a street sign addendum that no doubt proves very helpful to a particular target audience.Read More…