/blog > archive > April 2011

TransparencyRevolutionLogo

Special guest David Mather joins us to discuss  the relationship between business and information — how businesses are more reliant on industry, market, competitive information than ever before In greater volume To greater depth At a faster pace We look at where the problem arises in most organizations — finding the right data or getting it into the hands of decision-makers, and whether sharing or hoarding information represents a greater risk for most companies. About Our Guest: David Mather is a managing partner of Ensys Capital, LLC ,a private equity and investment company. Before joining Ensys Capital, LLC, David served as President of Hoover’s, Inc a D&B company focused on the growing internet information and media market segment. Listen to internet radio with PhilBowermaster on Blog Talk Radio Join us live at 2PM EDT / 11 AM PDT or access the show archive via the player above. Note: the player…

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250px-Legionsubspecial1

As a generally geeky person futurist, I am highly interested in the subject of superpowers. Our descendants, or our future selves if you like, will be possessed of amazing abilities. They will casually, as a matter of course, and without giving it a second thought, do things that would asbolutely astound us if we saw someone do them today. Read More…

stephen_colbert_NASA

A few weeks back I provided an outline of what I take to be the three basic characteristics of a transparent environment. I gave the three characteristics the following names:

  • Clarity
  • Single Version of truth
  • Two-way Street

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arianna-huffington

The class-action lawsuit being brought against the Huffington Post on behalf of unpaid bloggers demonstrates that not all organizational problems can be solved through transparency alone. The facts in the case are not in dispute:Read More…

russia

On a recent edition of my non-transparency-related podcast, my co-host and I talked with science fiction author Tobias Buckell about the major changes that are taking place in the publishing industry. Tobias mentioned his discomfort with how the term “revolution” is applied to these kinds changes. Having grown up in the Caribbean, he explained, he has seen real revolutions up close and believes using that term to describe something like the advent of ebooks is somewhat hyperbolic.
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TransparencyRevolutionLogo

Rob Bogosian joins us on The Transparency Revolution to discuss corporate silence, the willful withholding of work-related information. Rob provides an overview of:

  • How corporate silence comes about
  • Why individuals enagage in it, and why some managers create a culture that encourages it
  • The toll that organizations pay for engaging in corporate silence
  • The relationship between corporate silence and corporate transparency

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rerencestorelittle

I received a link to The Reference Store suspiciously close to April Fool’s Day and, since I’m always being burned by April Fool’s jokes, I was hesitant to blog about it. Further inspection of the site reveals items dated well before the first of April, plus references to competitor sites that turn out to be real — and that in fact look better than The Reference Store. Plus I dialed the number and got an answer — it was a recording, but still.Read More…

Image via Wikimedia Commons

We’re always posturing — all of us, all the time. Evolutionary biologists will tell you that status-seeking behavior is hardwired into primates. We are all descended from generation after generation of ancestors who were focused on achieving status and / or being perceived as the best possible choice. Successfully engaging in those behaviors provided a major reproductive benefit. Our remote ancestors were the members of the group who did the best job of posturing themselves. Our more recent ancestors, ditto. It’s a set of behaviors that has been continuously reinforced throughout human history — no wonder we’re so good at it. Somewhere along the line — probably very early on — posturing became a trait common to groups as well as individual human beings. The group that could show itself to be the most intimidating had a shot at getting what it wanted, sometimes without even having to fight for…

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blender

Fortune presents a list of job interview questions that are too clever — I was going to say “by half,” but in fact they’re too clever by about 1000%…if “clever” is even the right word. The article describes these questions as a “desperate measure” that employers have resorted to in light of the fact that there are too many candidates for the jobs available. I’m calling B.S. on that justification (although I don’t doubt for a second that some employers offer that explanation in all seriousness.)Read More…

law_books

I wrote recently about testimony before the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission concerning the growing practice of many companies to exclude the unemployed from consideration when hiring. This practice is discriminatory and short-sighted, as well as being bad business. But should it be illegal?Read More…