/blog > archive > April 2011

TransparencyRevolutionLogo

Corporate posturing is not only unavoidable, it’s necessary. Companies need to create a public perception, but what happens when that perception runs counter to the facts? Aside from the ethical considerations (which are considerable, of course) companies put themselves at risk when they start believing their own counter-factual posturing.

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utopia

Cynical Girl Laurie Ruettimann takes on the work bubble, beginning with some words of caution about getting carried away by all the hype:

If you listen to the pundits, we are all going to own our talent profiles, gamify the workplace (yes, that’s a new word), and communicate with our managers using ‘social tools’ in a more honest and authentic way.

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unnamed

The headline over at Ask a Manager says it all:

Someone Is Leaving their Fingernail Clippings in my Desk

The nail-clipping story is disturbing enough, but read the comments that follow at your own risk: people tell about finding tongue scrapers, ear-cleaning paraphernalia, dead flies (not random dead flies, but carefully collected and stacked dead flies), and, um, what I can only describe as very personal items, all left behind by previous (or worse yet, current-shared) occupants of their desks.

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WorldBlu-List_2011

According to WorldBlu.com, freedom is (not surprisingly) blue. WorldBlu publishes a list of certified “democratic workplaces,” including companies as diverse as Groupon and WD-40. A photo of Zappos* CEO Tony Hsieh graces the home page, accompanied by a quote extolling the virtues of “happy, engaged workplaces.”
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hillaryclinton

This news items caught my attention today:

Mini mystery: Where’s Hillary Clinton?

[I]t was very unusual when this week’s State Department public “week ahead” itinerary described Clinton as having no public appointments at all on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Indeed, her first public appointment is not scheduled until Thursday morning—and that is a highly ceremonial appearance: officiating at a symbolic swearing-in of children of State Department employees participating in take your child to work today.

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TransparencyRevolutionLogo

Special guest Dan Ridge joins us  to discuss why gimmicks and shortcuts are not the answer to fixing the hiring process, and how companies are missing out on opportunities to better position their business through that process. We discuss how sourcing can be improved: From  a process standpoint From a technology standpoint From a company branding standpoint The hiring process truly is a moment of truth for organizations — are they ready to rise to the occasion? About Our Guest: Dan Ridge is the CEO and Founder at CATO Services. He is also the Consultant and Chief Star Gazer at 5 Star Consulting Group, a leading talent acquisition, retention and right-sizing consulting firm. Dan Works with established companies and start ups ventures, with a focus on identifying opportunities for clients and delivering solutions that represent best practices and a significant ROI. Listen to internet radio with PhilBowermaster on Blog Talk…

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terminator2_l

Tuesday was an important day in the future history of our planet, at least for those who buy into the future as presented in the Terminator films. Basically, for those not aware, Tuesday represented the beginning of the end of the world. Entertainment Weekly “reported” as follows:Read More…

unemployment_sign3

A word of warning from Career Hub:

Here’s the issue: executive recruiters at two separate events I’ve attended in the last 90 days have said that they aren’t interested in presenting any candidate who has “consultant” on his resume to account for their time while job searching. Even more, they said that writing “consultant” is just a cover for being unemployed. When asked pointedly why they wouldn’t recommend a consultant for an internal executive position, they said that consultants were too used to working for multiple companies and that they wouldn’t stay.

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pretentiousmuch

Brad Peters at Forbes presents The Top 7 Stupidest Things Believed by Bad Companies. This is an excellent list. Number one is great (although I’ve never worked for a company that could even attempt to make that claim with a straight face) and number six is spot on:
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chickens-in-coop

On Friday’s podcast, former Hoover’s president David Mather and I were discussing the crucial differences between open and closed organizational cultures. I noted that closed cultures seem to organize their entire approach to information around the fear that some secret is going to get out. Companies subscribing to that view put rigid controls in place around the sharing of any and all information, which can inhibit the productivity of line staff while slowing managers in their ability to make crucial decisions — plus virtually guaranteeing that the decisions made will not be as well-informed as they might. The closed approach inaccurately pits transparency against legitimate company privacy concerns. As David so succinctly put it: “Transparency does not equate to non-privacy.” Exactly. There are many valid reasons why certain information is kept private. Depending on the industry and the competitive environment, a company’s entire viability can depend on information being kept…

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