/blog > archive > March 2011

Whatever is going on, I don't think it's that smart people are overrated.

This New York Times piece about Silicon Valley companies going gaga over hot engineering talent has certainly raised a few eyebrows. What’s not to like for this new generation of geeks: sushi, iPads, doggy facilities at the office, free haircuts, salaries grossly out of range with what is otherwise the going rate, and — this is the part that seems over-the-top for some — lessons in how to get out of these hellholes and start a start-up of one’s own! Read More…

bugles

Wally Block is calling for more transparency in the process used by the Ethisphere Institute in putting out their list of the world’s most ethical companies, as recently reported in Forbes. Block’s point is that “ethical” is one of those things like “pregnant” or “dead.” Either you are or you aren’t:Read More…

"I can't remember the last time that you invited me to your house for a cup of coffee."

Rafe Needleman at CNET provides a run-down on Zapoint’s 300 Campaign, about which I have commented here recently. Needleman concludes:

I’m not sure that Zapoint’s pitch to businesses — “We have data about your people; pay us and you can have it too” — will go over so well, but the company is one of several that is taking the historically private information of what we do at work and how well we do it, and making it public (See also: Honestly.com). The days of being able to hide behind a desk are coming to an end.

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disconnect2

Jon Hollon at TLNT reports that a new survey, the latest in a long line showing similar findings, reveals that workers are “fed up and ready to bolt.” The new survey is from MetLife. It’s entitled the 9th Annual Study of Employee Benefit Trends
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TransparencyRevolutionLogo

A friendly reminder from Dan Erwin. At work, you are being watched, checked in on, and listened to all the time:

From e-mail monitoring and website blocking to phone tapping and GPS tracking, employers increasingly use monitoring and surveillance to ‘manage productivity and minimize litigation, security, and other risks.’

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rebeccablack

Face it: there is no excuse. That’s a scary proposition.  If you never give it a try…well, there’s no one to blame but you. If you try, you might fail. But surely it’s better to fail spectacularly in a choose-yourself world than it is to live in frustrated “safety” in a world where the gatekeeper passed you by–especially if the gatekeeper is you.Read More…

indiagate

Via email, reader Anamika points out what a dangerous proposition openness can truly be:

On Thursday the BBC reported on the dangers faced by individuals that ask questions
under the Indian Right of Information Act (which came into force in 2005). The dangers according to the BBC report were assassination attempts on information seekers. These attempts seem to stem from angry government officials that were suspended due to the incriminating evidence that was unearthed under the Act.

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30225_m

A few years ago, some interesting research surfaced in Massachusetts showing that boards of directors in the state were overwhelmingly populated by white guys. The study looked at both non-profits and for-profits and provided some additional breakdown around health careRead More…

garyhamel

Here Dell VP James Franklin talks with management guru Gary Hamel — who gave us the concept of core competencies, among many other contributions — about the impact of social media on today’s organizations and the expectations of a workforce that is growing up on the web.
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TransparencyRevolutionLogo

Well, okay, not really. We’re on the Internet. But the point is that the world premiere of the audio version of the Transparency Revolution airs today, March 18 at 2:00 PM EDT / 11:00 AM PDT.Read More…