/blog > archive > February 2011

Phil's Lifechart

Now that has GOT to be a rhetorical question, right? Who needs a resume? Why anyone looking for a job, that’s who! And moreover, anyone who has a job should keep their resume current — you just never know when you’re going to need it. At least that’s the conventional wisdom. But let’s take a closer look.Read More…

initech3

Ladies and gentleman, I want to introduce to you a man who has inspired a generation. He has changed the the way we think about our careers, our relationships, the very meaning of our lives. Few of us can even hear the words “go ahead” without thinking of him.Read More…

EYE2

Survey 1200 CEO worldwide and ask them for their top priorities. What do you suppose would emerge as number one? Reasonable guesses would be concerns about market dynamics in a difficult economy, keeping up with the latest technologies, staying ahead of the competition, etc. But these would all be wrong. Read More…

Mac128

My first real post-college job was with a start-up software company providing a desktop publishing solution. Of course, these days “desktop publishing” sounds about as fresh and edgy as, say, “pocket pager,” but at the time it was the cutting edge of pre-Web high-tech hipness. We took great pride in the fact that we were bringing true publishing capability to the masses, at least those masses who had a Mac and a laser printer. One of our favorite slogans was the old adage, “the power of the press belongs to those who own one.”Read More…

Find a comfy spot and chill out. (Image via Wikimedia Commons)

Hi, I’m Skippy and today I join the blogging team here at Transparency Revolution. As a gainfully employed capybara, I’ve got my own views on how organizations should be run and I’m here to provide some alternative perspectives. Phil gets his say…how about a little equal time? Let’s start with the basics. If transparency is just not a fit for you or your organization, there are some pretty solid alternatives. Let’s look at three.Read More…

Image via Wikimedia Commons

Once upon a time, in the early days of the industrial revolution, the only jobs deemed suitable for automation were of the simple, repetitive variety. These were mostly manual tasks. Over time, the refinement of mechanical processes got a huge boost from the advent of computer technology, and increasingly sophisticated tasks fell subject to automation. Read More…

humancapital

Megan McArdle at The Atlantic reports on a disturbing trend observed from some recent testimony before the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Apparently, some employers are refusing to consider the unemployed when sourcing new hires.Read More…

Schimpanse_zoo-leipig

Last week’s Friday feature had me glancing back through the whole collection of CareerBuilder ads in their ongoing “don’t work with a bunch of monkeys” ads. I love these videos (and offshoots such as MonkeyMail, one of the cleverest digital campaigns ever, IMO) although I have to take issue with the cynicism of the messages that CareerBuilder has used them to push out over the years…
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Source: Wikimedia Commons

I know — taxes, spending, revitalized infrastructure, blah, blah, blah. What am I, an economist? Let the people who know that side of it argue about it and eventually work something out. Here’s an idea that might seem completely out of left field, but I think has a chance at really turning things around: if we want to fix the economy as a whole, we need to fix what’s wrong with individual organizations. Read More…

Mei-working-in-the-park

One of the interesting and perhaps unexpected results of the digital age has been the migration of certain activities from outside to inside the home. Homeschooling is enabled by the Internet as is home shopping. Sharlyn Lauby at HR Bartender points out that this is National Telework Week, honoring those who work from home or otherwise outside of the normal office environment, and encouraging those who do not to give it a try for a day or two.Read More…